Tag Results

21 posts tagged science

Frozen Bubbles Suspended Below Abraham Lake

Abraham Lake has become world famous, especially amongst photographers. The artificial lake, which lies in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies, is home to a rare phenomenon where bubbles get frozen right underneath its surface. They’re often referred to as ice bubbles or frozen bubbles.

What causes this to happen? As photographer Fikret Onal explains, “The plants on the lake bed release methane gas and methane gets frozen once coming close enough to much colder lake surface and they keep stacking up below once the weather gets colder and colder during [the] winter season.”

Though a gorgeous sight, this incredible destination isn’t for the weak or the weary. “Even though I’ve walked on a frozen lake before, Abraham Lake made me feel completely uneasy since the lake was not covered with snow,” says Onal. “Even though the icy surface was around 8-9 inches thick, it still scared the hell out of me, not only because of the fact that I could see all the cracks…and the darkness of the lake bottom through the glassy surface, but also [because of] the deep boomy, cracking sounds coming from underneath the lake’s surface.”

Click through for image sources.

10 Awe-Inspiring Photos of Lightning

What better way is there to show both the beauty and power of nature than with these incredibly electrifying images of lightning? While sometimes it just takes being at the right place at the right time, like for amateur photographer Bertrand Kulik and his photo of a brightly illuminated Eiffel Tower, for others, like Dan Ransom, it requires carefully assembling a composite image or “stacking” multiple photos together to showcase a wild electrical storm (like the one Ransom stunningly captured at the Grand Canyon). Whether these magnificent shots were the result of luck, hard work or patience, they all give us a deeper appreciation for a part of nature we rarely get to see.

Click through for image sources.

The World’s Most Beautiful Crater Lakes

If you approached the rim of a volcano and looked down into it, you might expect to see a lava pool, but if the volcano previously erupted and then the top of it collapsed into a huge bowl-shaped crater, or caldera, then what you might see when you peer over the rim is a beautiful crater lake. Sometimes the water is acidic and the lake has a bright greenish hue. Other times the water is a cloudy turquoise color, yet other times the lake may appear to be a very deep shade of blue. Crater Lake, Oregon, is one of the most well known, but crater lakes can be found all over the globe. If the volcano has been dormant for a long time, the water can be extremely clear because no river or streams flow into with sediment deposits.

Click through for descriptions, sources, and 30 more Crater Lakes.

The last men on the Moon - picture of the day

Jack Schmitt’s photograph was taken on a specially developed Hasselblad camera with a 70mm back, using a 60mm lens. The SO-368 Kodak Ektachrome film that was used in space was tougher and more reliable under difficult light conditions than the transparency film used on earth; it’s thinness allowed them to shoot hundreds of frames without changing the magazine. The Apollo 17 crew were the last people to set foot on the moon and returned to Earth 40 years ago today.

The last men on the Moon - picture of the day

Jack Schmitt’s photograph was taken on a specially developed Hasselblad camera with a 70mm back, using a 60mm lens. The SO-368 Kodak Ektachrome film that was used in space was tougher and more reliable under difficult light conditions than the transparency film used on earth; it’s thinness allowed them to shoot hundreds of frames without changing the magazine. The Apollo 17 crew were the last people to set foot on the moon and returned to Earth 40 years ago today.

Ice Rider Crosses World’s Oldest Lake

French photographer Matthieu Paley is the person behind this near unbelievable shot called Ice Rider that was taken in Siberia.

"A bird’s eye view of Lake Baikal, the world’s largest fresh water lake," writes Paley on his website. "During winter the ice is up to 1.5 metres thick, allowing trucks and animals to cross safely. The white lines are cracks in the ice and as temperatures change these emit loud shuddering noises, reinforcing the eerie atmosphere."

Lake Baikal holds many titles. It’s not only the world’s oldest lake at 25 million years old, it’s also the deepest and among the most clearest lakes in the world. For almost five months a year, it’s covered with ice.

Paley just came out with a new book called Pamir: Forgotten on the Roof of the World. The images, taken over the last 10 years, show the rarely photographed world of the less than 1,000 Kyrgyz. They’re a small group of people who live in Afghanistan’s Pamir mountains, who are practically cut-off from the rest of the world.

Ice Rider Crosses World’s Oldest Lake

French photographer Matthieu Paley is the person behind this near unbelievable shot called Ice Rider that was taken in Siberia.

"A bird’s eye view of Lake Baikal, the world’s largest fresh water lake," writes Paley on his website. "During winter the ice is up to 1.5 metres thick, allowing trucks and animals to cross safely. The white lines are cracks in the ice and as temperatures change these emit loud shuddering noises, reinforcing the eerie atmosphere."

Lake Baikal holds many titles. It’s not only the world’s oldest lake at 25 million years old, it’s also the deepest and among the most clearest lakes in the world. For almost five months a year, it’s covered with ice.

Paley just came out with a new book called Pamir: Forgotten on the Roof of the World. The images, taken over the last 10 years, show the rarely photographed world of the less than 1,000 Kyrgyz. They’re a small group of people who live in Afghanistan’s Pamir mountains, who are practically cut-off from the rest of the world.

therhumboogie:

By Sweet Fern Productions, this melancholic and educational video all made in paper crafts depicts the process of a whale after death and how it gives life to the ocean. It may be short but I was engrossed by the delicate models and clever puppetry.

(via therhumboogie)

Reblogged from The Rhumboogie